​Why people matter

Why creating a 'space' for your (science) community SHOULD be your priority.

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Jul 23, 2015
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Scientists work in (lab) groups. They collaborate, in groups. They use their peers at almost every point of the research cycle, to verify, justify, question, understand, criticise. Science journals exist because of the outcomes of these working groups and conversations.

When the 'digital' world encompassed journals, every effort was made to transfer the product, the article, the journal, into a digital form. So why the lag in giving scientists a digital place in which to collaborate? Maybe it is because words are like objects that have to be 'physically' moved (or typed) by us. They don't just appear in a digital space without our help. Perhaps we feel that the very capable, smart people that perform scientific research can do it all themselves, they can create a digital space and survive there on their own without nurture.

Who knows? What we do know is that there is more we could do to foster scientific collaboration using technology. We also know that what matters most is the people. The conversation. The imparting of knowledge from peer to peer, teacher to student, Jedi to Padawan. Publishers and technology providers have a responsibility to create places for these people to converse and efficiently impart knowledge in order to continue to further scientific research.

Do you agree? I'd love to hear your thoughts. Comment or send me a message.

Go to the profile of Emma Green

Emma Green

Business Development & Publishing Consultant, Zapnito

My focus is mainly (but not exclusively) on the STM market, looking at ways in which Zapnito can help support and develop STM publishing business models. I trained as a scientist in developmental genetics at Newcastle university, received my postgraduate degree from University of East Anglia, and spent three years at Brown University in the US. I have almost 20 years' experience in STM publishing, having worked for Springer and then Nature Publishing Group, in roles including Associate Publisher for the physical science journals and Head of Digital Tools and Services. I have two young boys, am a governor at their school, and I teach five year olds to learn to read.

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